SIG01-C. Understand implementation-specific details

The following are 40 code examples for showing how to use signal.SIGUSR1().They are from open source Python projects. You can vote up the examples you like or vote down the ones you don't like. Here is a longer example showing how signals can be used for interprocess communication. This is what the SIGUSR1 and SIGUSR2 signals are provided for. Since these signals are fatal by default, the process that is supposed to receive them must trap them through signal or sigaction. The following are 40 code examples for showing how to use signal.SIGUSR2().They are from open source Python projects. You can vote up the examples you like or vote down the ones you don't like. Of course it doesn't have to work with rsync, it was just an example of an application (here: dd) that sets up a signal handler for SIGUSR1 for a useful function. – the busybee Aug 23 '19 at 6:08 add a comment | CELEBP73 /* CELEBS73 This example demonstrates the use of the sigwait() function. The program will wait until a SIGINT signal is received from the command line. Many Unix programs accept signals like USR1 and USR2.For example, to upgrade the executable for Nginx on the fly, you send kill -USR2.. I understand that USR1 is a "user defined" signal, meaning that whoever created the program can use it to mean "shut down" or "dump your logs" or "print foo a thousand times" or whatever. Oct 22, 2017 · This feature is not available right now. Please try again later.

* - SIGUSR1 and SIGUSR2 are set from handler(). * - however, signals are masked until we return to * main(). * - returning to main() unmasks SIGUSR1 and SIGUSR2. * - pending SIGUSR1 now occurs, handler() is called. * - pending SIGUSR2 now occurs. Since we don't have * a handler for SIGUSR2, we are killed. */ Classification: POSIX 1003.1

For example, sending SIGQUIT terminates the program and generates a core dump; sending SIGINT is equivalent to hitting Ctrl-C; sending SIGTERM or SIGKILL kills the program. We use SIGUSR1 here because it illustrates a way of using user-defined signals. Apr 22, 2017 · This example ignores SIGINT and raises SystemExit when it sees SIGUSR1. Each ^C in the output represents an attempt to use Ctrl-C to kill the script from the terminal. Using kill-USR1 72598 from another terminal eventually causes the script to exit.

Many Unix programs accept signals like USR1 and USR2.For example, to upgrade the executable for Nginx on the fly, you send kill -USR2.. I understand that USR1 is a "user defined" signal, meaning that whoever created the program can use it to mean "shut down" or "dump your logs" or "print foo a thousand times" or whatever.

Example : In the example below, the SIGINT ( = 2) signal is blocked and no signals are pending. A signal is sent to a process setting the corresponding bit in the pending signals integer for the process. Each time the OS selects a process to be run on a processor, the pending and blocked integers are checked. signal — Asynchronous System Events — PyMOTW 3 Apr 22, 2017 Linux Signals – Example C Program to Catch Signals (SIGINT